My current work in progress:

1. "T-Rex," designed by Rebecca Danger, knit from Blue moon Fiber Arts Socks That Rock in the "Lucky" colorway on U.S. size 3 needles.
2. Myriad stealth projects.

Mighty Shawls From Little Edgings Grow

Because I’m geeky that way, I looked up the origins of the phrase “mighty oaks from little acorns grow.” The earliest similar phrase I could find was from my old buddy Geoffrey Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde (late 1300s):

“as an ook cometh of a litel spyr”

Did I ever tell you I used to be able to read (and to a certain extent speak) Middle English? And no, it wasn’t during the Middle Ages, it was during graduate school. Which was almost as far back as the Middle Ages.

But I digress.

Behold the little edging:

Edging082909 240x160 Mighty Shawls From Little Edgings Grow

This is the beginning of a shetland-style rectangular shawl. I am knitting it from Jojoland 2-ply cashmere, which is a laceweight with 400 yards per 50-gram skein.

Cashmere083109 240x160 Mighty Shawls From Little Edgings Grow

I love rectangular shawls, but I hate knitting on the edging afterward. Miles and miles of mind-numbing edging — arrrgh!

So I’m employing a mitered-corner technique here.

You start by knitting the bottom left corner — do a provisional cast on and knit the corner using short rows. Then you knit across the bottom border in as many repeats as you need, and do another short row corner for the bottom right. Turn your work, work across those live stitches, pick up stitches along the straight edge of the border repeats you worked, then undo your provisional cast-on and work across those stitches, and Bob’s your uncle!

Here is the etymology of “Bob’s your uncle.”)

Now you are ready to work back and forth across the shawl, working the border along with the body of your shawl. When you get to the top, you do a similar maneuver — work a short row corner, work a border across the top of the body stitches, attaching the border as you work, then work the last corner.

Easy as pie!

Well, not easy as pie to figure out. At least not for me. It took me a bit of winkling to get the corners to work properly.

The shawl is worked in garter stitch and has lace patterning on both right and wrong sides, so that it is continually entertaining to knit. I’m using a US size 3 (3.25mm) needle, so it is a bit slow going. The unblocked gauge is 6 stitches and 8 rows to the inch.

How long will I make it? I have a total of 1600 yards of the yarn, so I’ll either knit until it looks long enough, or til I run out of yarn.

Lucy is no doubt lost in thought — the coming delights of a cashmere kitty blanket!

Lucy083109 240x160 Mighty Shawls From Little Edgings Grow

It’s Faro Easy!

In all its blocked glory:

Faroeasy083009 203x240 Its Faro Easy!

This took approximately 600 yards of dk/light sportweight weight yarn — Lorna’s Laces Pearl, in the “Mineshaft” colorway. I used 3 100-gram skeins (220 yards each) and had 30 grams leftover from the last skein. US 7 (4.5mm) needle.

Faroeasy083009a 191x240 Its Faro Easy!

The wingspan is about 72″, and it’s about 26″ down the center back.

Faroeasy083009b 240x138 Its Faro Easy!

The pattern will be available in a couple of days. icon smile Its Faro Easy!

We Have a Winner

Congratulations to Emmy Jay who has won my copy of Men’s Knits: 20 New Classics by Erika Knight. Thanks to everyone who left a comment!

Am I Still Knitting Socks?

sock083009 160x240 Its Faro Easy!

Yes.

Am I Still Knitting Lace?

Lace083009 240x160 Its Faro Easy!

Yes.

Lucy Sez

Lucy083009 240x160 Its Faro Easy!

“This is a nice kitty blanket, Momma!”

You May Commence Groaning Now

Why? Because I have named my new shawl pattern “Faro-Easy Shawl.”

How easy is it? I finished it in under a week. Gotta love knitting with DK-weight yarn right after knitting with laceweight!

shawl082709 180x240 You May Commence Groaning Now

But I’ve not blocked it yet, so the official FO post will have to wait til Sunday. The color in that photo is way off because I was shooting into the sun.

In the meantime . . .

Book Review!

I have in my hot little hands (and have had for a week or so) a copy of this book:

Book082709 219x240 You May Commence Groaning Now

Men’s Knits: 20 New Classics by Erika Knight. The publication date is September 1 — next Tuesday.

As the title suggests, this is a collection of classic designs for men. I love how the table of contents has photos of each design:

Book082709g 240x155 You May Commence Groaning Now

And there are some accessories as well as sweaters:

Book082709h 240x148 You May Commence Groaning Now

For each design, there is a photo of the sweater being worn by a “real” looking guy, as well as a photo of the sweater lying flat, with arrows superimposed on it to show you exactly where the size measurements were taken.

Of course, most of the models were young and cute:

Book082709e 240x166 You May Commence Groaning Now

But there are a couple of older guys in here too. Here’s one of them:

Book082709c 196x240 You May Commence Groaning Now

For the most part, the sweaters are indeed classic and non-fussy — perfect guy sweaters. This is the only one that gave me pause:

Book082709d 194x240 You May Commence Groaning Now

But I think it is just a matter of a too-big sweater on the model. Your mileage may vary, but most guys I know would not wear an oversized sweater like that.

Well, the back cover photo made me stop and think as well:

Book082709a 204x240 You May Commence Groaning Now

The cardigan looks rather ill-fitting but then, the pants do too.

There’s a range of sizes — from small to xxl. But a word of warning: the small is generally a 36″ chest, and the xxl is 44″. When I think of xxl for a man’s size, I think of 50″ or so. If you are knitting for a big guy, these sizes might not work for you.

There’s a wide variety of yarns represented from chunky to fingering, all of which could be swapped out and subbed with little problem, I think.

Okay, who would like my review copy?

If you’d like to be entered in a drawing to receive this book, leave a comment to this post by noon Eastern time on Sunday, August 30, 2009. I’ll draw a name at random then.

Lucy sez:

Lucy082709 240x160 You May Commence Groaning Now

“I can’t wait!”

Miscellany

Miscellaneous Item Number One

The Sandvik shawl is now available for sale on Ravelry, but you can purchase it from here, too (and from my Patterns for Sale page):

Sandvik Faroese Shawl

SandvikBack082409 211x240 Miscellany

This shawl is knit from laceweight yarn (Black Bunny Fibers alpaca/shetland blend) on a US 3 (3.25mm) needle at an unblocked gauge of 6 sts/8 rows to the inch. I used between 900 — 1000 yards.

You can make the shawl longer or shorter by simply knitting more or fewer rows. The bottom is finished with a seed stitch band

Unblocked: 52” across the top edge (wingspan), 22” down the center back
Lightly Blocked: 64” across the top edge (wingspan), 26” down the center back

buy now Miscellany

Miscellaneous Item Number Two

A view of the sky at 6:00 this morning:

Sky082609 240x180 Miscellany

Miscellaneous Item Number Three

What I’m knitting:

Shawl082609 240x160 Miscellany

It’s another Faroese shawl, this one being knit from the bottom up. And a lot faster knit than Sandvik, because it is knit from a much heavier yarn, using a US 7 (4.5mm) needle.

The yarn is Lorna’s Laces Pearl, and I bought it a few weeks ago when The Loopy Ewe had all Lorna’s Laces yarns on sale. It’s dk/light worsted weight and it’s a blend of bamboo and silk. This is my first time using it and I’m loving it. My colorway is “Mineshaft.”

DK weight on a size 7 goes much faster than laceweight on a size 3. Imagine that.

Lucy sez:

Lucy082609 240x160 Miscellany

“Well, duh.”

Sandvik

Shortly after arriving home last Friday evening I cast off the final few stitches of Sandvik. Within 5 minutes of that happy event, it was on my ironing board, having the living crap steamed out of it.

Then I spread it out on the floor for an bird’s eye shot.

SandvikLucy082409 240x190 Sandvik

The yarn is an alpaca/shetland blend laceweight handpainted by the always delightful (not to mention talented) Carol of Black Bunny Fibers. I used a US size 3 (3.25mm) needle and under 1000 yards to knit a shawl that when lightly steam-blocked, measures approximately 26″ down the center back, and has a 64″ wingspan.

SandvikBack082409 211x240 Sandvik

This is a Faroese style shawl, which means it has extra shaping in the shoulders that helps it stay put when you wear it.

SandvikShoulder082409 240x160 Sandvik

It has a Celtic-braid-looking thingie down the center back, flanked by an all-over diamond pattern.

SandvikBackCloseup082409 240x160 Sandvik

Over the weekend, I coerced one of the workshop attendees to model Sandvik for a photo shoot. This is Vicki:

SandvikVickiA082409 160x240 Sandvik

Vicki did her best to convince me to write a shawl book, to no avail. But let me tell you, she can be very wheedlesome! Even though I flatly refused to consider a shawl book, she obligingly did a “wingspan” shot, too.

SandvikVicki082409 240x160 Sandvik

Expect the pattern for Sandvik soon, very soon.

Speaking of patterns, you can now buy a hardcopy of the pattern for The Exonumist’s Shawl over at the Loopy Ewe, here.

Just sayin’.

Lucy Sez:

Lucy082509 240x188 Sandvik

“Where did she put my pink blankie? Is it here?”