My current work in progress:

Moth Cardigan, designed byAmy Christoffers, knit from Rowan SoftYak DK in the Plain colorway, using U.S. size 3 and 5 needles.

Sideways

The title does not refer to the 2004 movie, but rather the direction in which I am working my new commuter project: sideways!

WIP090210 240x226 Sideways

This is a shawl design I am working up. I started by casting on 4 stitches and am working  increases to make my work grow. The increases are done in the plain garter stitch body of the shawl, and I am knitting a sideways edging as I go.

There are a couple of advantages to working a shawl in this way. One is that you can use up all your yarn without fear of running out. Before you start, weigh your yarn. Then simply work the shawl, increasing as directed, until you have used up half of your yarn — this will be the center point of the triangular shawl. Now you knit the second half, working decreases to match the increases you did on the first half.

The other advantage is that you don’t have hugely long rows to knit like you do towards the end as you knit a triangular shawl from the top down.

My yarn is Madelintosh Pashmina in the “Posy” colorway. It’s a merino/cashmere/silk blend and has 360 yards per skein and it is a gorgeous yarn! I am using a U.S. size 7 (4.5mm) needle.

And I am working on Wispy as my “at home” project.

There were a couple of questions about my three-needle bind-off, including how to do it. If you do a google search on “three-needle bind-off” you will find all sorts of websites and videos that demonstrate this technique. Here is a list of videos I got from a google search.

Aside: Pretty much every knitting technique that people email me about, asking how to do it, has a how-to video somewhere on the internet. My responses to these emails invariably starts “A quick google search gave me the following resources . . . ”  Therefore, I respectfully request that before emailing me to ask me to explain a technique via email, you google it for yourself. Thanks!

I am plugging away on my ribbing portion — think I am slightly less than halfway done with it right now. After I bind-off the portion of the ribbing that gets bound off, I’ll post a photo of the back of Wispy so you can see my three-needle bind-off clearly.

Wispy090210 240x160 Sideways

Alrighty! Here in the U.S. we have a three-day weekend coming up: Labor Day weekend, the un-official end of summer. I am off work tomorrow so I can prepare for my weekend houseguests. I’ll pop back in during my weekend fun on Sunday to post Part Five, the last part of the Shetland Pi pattern. See you then!

Lucy sez:

Lucy090210 240x160 Sideways

“I’m resting up so I can help Momma tomorrow.”

Hurray for September

Words cannot adequately express how happy I am that it is September. While it is still wicked hot and humid, the end is in sight! Autumn will be approaching soon!

In a fit of knitting productivity, I got a lot accomplished last night.

I completed the second half of the shrug portion of the Wispy Cardi, steam-blocked both pieces, joined them via a three-needle bind-off, seamed the sleeves, and picked up the stitches around the piece for the ribbing.

Wispy090110 240x160 Hurray for September

Phew!

After steam-blocking the pieces, I am so happy with the knitted fabric for this. The yarn blocked out like a dream and the piece is beautifully soft and drapy. No wonder Lucy loves it.

I successfully mattress-stitched the sleeve seams.

Sleeve090110 240x160 Hurray for September

And I did a very careful pick-up of stitches and knit one row of ribbing.

Stitches090110 240x160 Hurray for September

But that’s not all . . .

I did wind up a skein of yarn and started a new commuter project.

NewWIP090110 240x160 Hurray for September

Details tomorrow!

Lucy sez:

Lucy090110 240x160 Hurray for September

“The suspense is killing me!”