My current work in progress:

Roscalie Cardigan by Alice Starmore, knit from Jamieson’s Shetland Spindrift¬† on a US 3 needle

Slower Than Cold Molasses Running Up Hill

That’s something my mom used to say. Well, she probably still says it, but I haven’t heard her say it lately.

It is a good description of my knitting progress this week, though. I knit exactly three rows on my shawl last night before I was too tired to think straight. Here you go:

Shawl081309

Looks pretty much the same as yesterday, yes?

The title for my blog post got me wondering about the expression “slower than cold molasses running up hill” so I started a-googling. Here we go a-googling among the leaves so green! Come on, sing it with me.

The search returned 13,000 results.

One of those results was a site on how to speak like a Canadian. Go figure. My maternal grandfather’s family was Canadian, so perhaps how the phrase insinuated its way into my mom’s vocabulary.

But I also found it listed on a website of old Southern slang. Well, now.

And more specifically, I found it referred to as Tennessee slang. Hmmmmm . . .

But no matter where it came from, it is designated as Worthless Saying #67.

What’s your favorite worthless saying?

(Did you see what I did there? I have almost no knitting content to speak of so I quickly diverted your attention away from the knitting.)

Lucy Sez:

Lucy081309

Most worthless expression? “You’ve had enough Wildside Salmon Treats.”